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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

PERSONAL SPECIAL.................... 7 Tips to Find Yourself When You're Feeling Lost

7 Tips to Find Yourself When You're Feeling Lost

Whether you've lost yourself in your job, relationship, your role as a parent or simply feel lost in life in general, you are not alone. It doesn't mean your life is doomed and that you will never find yourself again. It simply means you are going through an incubation period and transformation. The key is not to gestuck in your current lost state and to tap into your creative power to create a life you love.
Here are seven tips that will help you out of this lost state and remind you of the power you have to create a life you love.
1. Remember what you love to do and go do it! 
Do you remember the last time you had fun in your life? Do you remember when things felt easy and in the flow? It was likely because you were fully engrossed in the fun of the moment. As we grow up, we lose sight of how amazing life can be because we feel burdened by the responsibilities and mundane parts of life. It's time to reconnect with what you love and to take action on it. No more excuses about not having the time, money, resources, babysitter etc. Make a commitment to do what you love and watch your life change before your very eyes.

2. Go on an adventure. 
Whether it's a day trip, a solitary retreat, or a week-long drive along the coast, go out and explore the world. This will not only allow you to tap into the flow, but it will also give you the time and focus to really reconnect with yourself again. You'll be away from the noise of your regular life and will be able to see and experience the world with fresh eyes. I promise, when you come back you will have far more clarity about where you are going than you had when you started.

3. Reconnect with your dreams and dream BIG.
What kinds of dreams did you have for your life before you lost yourself in the busy-ness of life? What have you since deemed impossible or improbable because of where you are today? Grab a journal and reconnect with the dreams you once had and better yet, come up with some new dreams. In a perfect world, what would you love to be, have, or do? What is your soul aching for? Once you reconnect with your dreams, you'll have the desire and inspiration to begin to take action and suddenly you will have found yourself again.

4. Expand your comfort zone regularly. 
It's time to get uncomfortable by trying new things and meeting new people. Growth doesn't happen by staying in your bubble of comfort where everything is familiar. Challenge yourself to do something that is slightly terrifying, yet invigorating. That is what I like to call the zone. It's the space where you are stretching yourself just enough to continue to grow and evolve. What's the first thing that came to mind for you? Go do that!

5. Get quiet and listen. 
Everyday there are signs, messages, and guideposts that will inspire you to act, but you only notice them if you are open. With all the mind chatter and busy-ness we have these days it can be difficult to recognize the signs that are all around, so it's important to get quiet and listen. Pay attention to the signs on the road, songs on the radio, and the people you meet in the street. There are messengers all around with Divine guidance to help you move forward on your path. Your key to finding yourself may very well be on a billboard or come to you as a thought in the shower. Listen up, pay attention, and then follow through on your inspired action.

6. Remember you have the power to be, have, and do anything you desire.
Sometimes the feeling of being lost is all-consuming and you forget that you get to choose what you think and how you feel. You are given a great amount of power to create the life you desire and get the answers you are looking for. Whether you use affirmations, mantras, meditation, yoga, journaling or something else, it's important to focus on the beauty and joy around you. When you do that, the Universe sends you more of the same, including the answers you are seeking.

7. Ask for help. 
There are so many people in the world whose purpose it is to help people like you. Reach out and ask for help. You don't have to figure this out all on your own and sometimes simply having a chat with someone can provide the insight you need to move forward with ease. Whether it's a life coach, mentor, friend, counselor, or the Divine, ask for help and be open to the guidance and tools that come your way.

Lamisha Serf-Walls

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lamisha-serfwalls/7-tips-to-find-yourself-when-youre-feeling-lost_b_7514516.html?ncid=newsltushpmg00000003&ir=India&adsSiteOverride=in

TRAVEL SPECIAL .........................Sneak A Peak

 Sneak A Peak

It’s that time of the year when you must rekindle your affair with the hills. But not the closest, not the easiest, not the path most taken...

A FAMOUS ENGLISH mountaineer and author, Joe Simpson, described it as “the beckoning silence of great height”. Some kind of “inverted gravity” that attracted people to climb massive mountains. And if you ask the new-age travellers in India flocking to the hills, they’ll swear they’ve felt this pull too. It’s not just the closest hill station that’s on the radar of the Indian traveller anymore. The desire to explore has fuelled the search for less frequented trails. Destinations that are “offbeat” have grown in popularity with each passing year, with more people willing to expand their travel horizons than ever before.
But at what point did this urge to head off for the mountains become so irrepressible that it became a trend? Or is it all an old romance given the twist of modern love? Anil Nair, news editor of The
Outdoor Journal, a publication which specialises in stories related to the outdoors, thinks this ‘trend’ has been there since the ’70s. “But such travel choices were limited to single-minded adventure seekers or travellers... there was no collective ‘movement’ as such,” he says, and adds, “Now with the Internet and blogs, people are able to pen down their experiences. That has contributed to this wave of new-age explorers.” When asked what draws him personally to the mountains, Nair promptly says, “Solitude and pure air... and no traffic jams!”
For Sankara Subramanian, a popular travel blogger ( Be On The Road),  it’s the sheer size of the mountains and their all-encompassing vastness that attracts him. “It’s so humbling. Also, there are so many stories in and of the mountains, the people are so warm, always welcoming.” He says it’s always advisable to travel with a partner, especially if you’re driving or motorcycling to far-flung places. “I avoid travelling in large groups though. I like to meet new people, make new memories, and just be with the solitude of the mountains.”
This affair with the hills can sometimes be so torrid that many contemplate leaving their jobs, just to be able to travel. But that’s obviously not practical. Dheeraj Sharma, founder of the widely popular online travel community Devil On Wheels, says he routinely gets a lot of queries from people who just want to quit and travel. “I always say that you should take a sabbatical instead. I have been travelling for close to five years and I’ve managed to do it without quitting my job. You just need to learn how to plan your leaves five or six months in advance.”
One facet of travelling into lesser-known destinations is the effect it can have on the immediate ecosystem. Mathew Kurien, art director at The Outdoor Journal, says that one must understand the dos and don’ts while travelling and most importantly, not pollute the environment. “First-time campers should keep sanitation issues in mind. We’re doing a series, on how to poop responsibly while camping – you can just dig a six-inch cathole about 200m from a river while answering nature’s call. The point is to be responsible for the environment while travelling.”
Another often overlooked aspect, when it comes to travelling to offbeat places, is – a bit ironically perhaps – how a zealously guarded remote place becomes victim to mainstream tourism. Photographer Abhishek Bali says, “As an ardent traveller, I do feel that some places should be left as they are in their natural pristine state, that they should not be commercialised. But it is our habit as human beings to travel to all corners of the earth, to explore, to discover.”
And perhaps it is this inherent, basic instinct that’s driving more and more people to seek out destinations that were earlier just a mere blip on the tourist radar, to explore beyond the obvious, to not just see but also experience, feel and remember.

MEESAPULIMALA
WHERE: Idduki district, Kerala HOW TO GO: Accessible from Munnar, which is about 10 hours by bus from Bengaluru
WHEN TO GO: All year round
Okay, facts first: Meesapulimala is the second highest peak in south India. Now chew on this: At 2,640 metres (8,661 feet), it is the second highest point in India, after the Himalaya-Karakoram mountain range. You need to be willing to walk, and have a penchant for adventure to visit it.
And now, the trip and the experience: five friends set out one November, to see what this ‘second highest peak in South India’ looks like. Back at that time, we had already scaled a couple of southern Indian peaks.
Fast forward to Munnar, a place popular with ‘vacation crowds’ that gather here to drink some ‘masala chai’ and feel the wind blow through their hair. Too crowded to handle, we escape the rush, jump into a rather big auto rickshaw, that takes us to the starting point of the trek, about 26km outside town. The base camp is a forest rest camp run by Kerala Tourism, with a few tents and a friendly cook, and our guide Muthu. Night rolls in, there’s much laughter, tales are traded, and slowly sleep comes over us.
Next morning, we are told we should be at the top within four hours. After walking for about an hour, through forest meadows and springs, we come to a small camping ground in the middle of the forest called “Rhodo Valley” – and yes, it has rhododendrons and pine trees. As we climb up, we go through wide, undulating meadows and grasslands strongly reminiscent of the Alpine meadows or ‘bugiyals’ of the Himalayas up north. As we slowly segue into the landscape, we seem to become inconsequential dots in this vast tapestry of wilderness.
Three hours we trek, up and down, through clouds, and chest-high grass, going up the Meesapulimala ridge, which rises steeply towards the peak. When we finally reach the top, the view reminds me of Ladakh’s vistas. Below, there’s Kerala on one side, and Tamil Nadu on the other.

MUNSIYARI
WHERE: Pithoragarh district, Uttarakhand HOW: Taxi/Bus from Nainital or Almora
WHEN TO GO: March to June, ideally
You’ll find Munsiyari/Munsyari where the road ends towards the north-east of the Kumaon region in Uttarakhand, and the trail for some mighty treks across glaciers begins. It’s a two-day drive from Delhi, and the route takes you through Moradabad, Rampur, Haldwani, Bhimtal, Almora, Kausani and Chaukori. One can either take a night halt at Kausani or Chaukori. From Kausani, you get a clear view of majestic peaks such as Trishul, Nanda Devi, Nanda Kot and Panchchuli. No wonder, Mahatma Gandhi described it as the “Switzerland of India!”
Once you reach Munsiyari, the Panchchuli peaks stand tall in front of you. They are grand and imposing. They grow on you. The best part of my trip was sitting and enjoying the beauty of Panchchuli during daybreak when the sun rises behind the soaring peaks, and also during sunset when they are bathed in a soft warm red glow.
There is a lot to do and see around Munsiyari for both the adventure enthusiast and someone who is just looking for a bit of peace and tranquility. If one doesn’t want to do a strenuous trek like the Milam glacier trek, the Khuliya Top hike is a good option in the region which goes through pine forests and offers a panoramic view of the Panchchuli peaks.
You can also visit Madkote village and have a bath at the hot springs which leave a pleasant, if slightly greasy aftereffect – it’s been known to cure skin diseases. And yes, a short hike to the Birthi waterfall nearby to feel the mist on your face is an experience not to be missed!

NAUKUCHIATAL
26km from Nainital, Uttarakhand
This small hill station between Bhimtal and Nainital has a picturesque lake with nine corners (hence, the name). Naukuchiatal has a couple of sprawling resorts with luxurious cottages overlooking the lake that offer a perfect relaxing atmosphere to beat the heat. Spend an afternoon by taking a leisurely boat ride on the lake or drive to the other lake destinations around, like Nainital and Sattal.

NARKANDA
60km from Shimla, Himachal Pradesh
Love the queen of hill stations but want to escape the mad rush of tourists that Shimla attracts every summer? Narkanda will let you do exactly that. Offering spectacular views of snow-capped mountains, dense forests and apple orchards, this little town that turns into a ski resort in the winter is perfect for a quick summer retreat. You can hike up to Hatu peak or even drive down to
Shimla for a lazy stroll along the Mall Road.

LANDOUR
35km from Dehradun, Uttarakhand
A quiet little cantonment town nestled in the lap of dense deodar forests, Landour is a Raj-era hill station and is the twin town to Mussoorie. It is home to Ruskin Bond, and is also known for its homemade cheeses and wood-fire pizzas.

RAIGAD

WHERE: Approximately 150 km from Mumbai HOW: Accessible by road from Panvel, Karjat and Pune (130 km approx); lies off the Mumbai–Pune Expressway

PRASHAR LAKE
 WHERE: North of Mandi, Himachal Pradesh HOW: Take a bus from Mandi, but check timings before you leave. Taxis can also be hired

PRATAPGAD
24km from Mahabaleshwar, Maharashtra
In the monsoons, this fort wears a very menacing but come-explore-or-get-lost-in-me look, as the dark clouds and fog hang over it. Built by Shivaji in 1656, who defeated Afzal Khan, the commander of the Bijapur Sultanate, here, the fort is perched 1,080 metres above sea level on a hill and is flanked by steep drops. It also has breathtaking views of the Konkan Coast. The history lover can dwell over the fact that they say Afzal Khan’s head is buried under the road that approaches the fort. For the nature lover, there are beautiful ponds to stare into and long, dark paths full of greenery to amble along.

RAJMACHI
15km from Lonavala, Maharashtra
You can get to Rajmachi fort (built in 1657) through two treks – the hard one includes a climb of 2,000 feet from Kondivade, near Karjat, and the simple way is to just walk 15km from Lonavala. But both lead to magnificent views that accompany the two citadels (Shrivardhan and Manaranjan) that overlook waterfalls and the lush green forests of the Sahyadri mountains. The ramparts of the fort are ideal for discussing life as you take in the view of the Bor Ghat, which was once a trade route between Mumbai and Pune. It’s got religious flavour too. You can either check out the temple of Kal Bhairava, the local deity, or the Buddhist caves, dated around 200 BC.

MALSHEJ GHAT
About 130km from Pune, Maharashtra
A mountain pass, part of the Western Ghats, Malshej Ghat has a stunning range of flora and fauna. A great spot for birders as a host of Siberian migratory birds fly in between July and September. If you’re lucky you can even witness the dance of flamingoes! For the more enterprising, Shivneri Fort (the birthplace of Chhatrapati Shivaji) is not very far off from here.
  • by Asad Ali and Satarupa Paul  HTBR14JUN15


GADGET REVIEW - PHONES THAT GO BEYOND FLAGSHIP

GADGET REVIEW - PHONES THAT GO BEYOND FLAGSHIP


With the constant innovation on Android, having a plain old flagship model just isn't enough. Both LG and Samsung, have gone beyond the norm to showcase what we like to call super-flagships

Over time, mobiles have gotten better and better, to the point that their processors are powerful enough to run laptops. But that was just one race. Market leaders are looking beyond just offering a faster product ­ they're looking at innovating in ways that will change the way we use mobiles.
In this particular case, both LG and Samsung have their yearly offering in place with the upcoming G4 for LG, and the S6 for Samsung. But just having one superphone is not enough. Also launched are Samsung's S6 Edge, which adds extra functionality to the S6's edges and LG's G Flex 2, which immerses you in media more than any other mobile. We take a closer look at both these devices that have gone beyond what flagships offer.
LG G FLEX 2
Sequel to the very experimental G Flex, the LG G Flex 2 pretty much does everything that we wanted from the original.
To start with, the 5.5-inch display is now full-HD, with a 403ppi pixel density that's way better than its predecessors, and does suit the size of the phone as well. Sure, the competition is popping up with near-4K displays, but there is a limitation to how far you can push a curved display. And that's the other thing. The curved aspect of the screen does not seem to make much sense at first, as it doesn't add anything to the functionality of the phone. But play a full screen video, a game that uses the screen horizontally or even go through a photo slideshow, and you can feel the immersion it offers. It's more effective than 3D on handheld devices, in our opinion.
Even the 13MP camera is really impressive with a good number of features. We like the fact that LG held back on adding gimmicky camera apps, to just bloat up your phone's storage, and instead focussed on adding functionality that matters ­ like the 4K or slowmotion (120fps in 720p) video modes. The front camera seems a bit compromised with just a 2.1MP resolution, but it's still good for quick selfies, especially with features like gesture support and beauty shot.
LG has added a good number of apps on the G Flex 2 to make it worthwhile, and it also comes with a bundled smart flip cover. But in raw performance ­ the kind you'd expect from a high-end device ­ the G Flex 2 doesn't feel like a powerhouse of a performer. And that's exactly what stops it from being the device we can highly recommend.
SAMSUNG GALAXY S6 EDGE
Not that the Samsung Galaxy S6 is a bad looking phone. But the S6 Edge, is downright gorgeous. With the edges curving around both sides of the device, the screen not only gets a sleeker edgeless look, but it also adds some addi tional functionaly to the device. Besides the edge aspect of it, the screen is definitely one of the best we've seen in Android. With a 1440x2560 pixel resolution fitted into the 5.1-inch screen, even the smallest font sizes are as comfortable to read as premium print in a glossy magazine.
Even the camera stands out as the best we've seen on offer on an Android device. The 16MP primary camera is excellent under all lighting conditions, making even the darkest spaces seem adequately lit. But besides the picture quality, it was the response time of the camera that really impressed us. It starts just about as soon as you touch the icon and it doesn't have any noticeable shutter lag.
The 5MP front cam gives you high-res selfies with the beauty shot feature.
Samsung opted to go with their very own Exynos octa core chipset, instead of the usual Snapdragon.
We have to admit, the results are far better than we expected. It stood out as a trailblaz er in all the benchmarks and tests we threw at it, head ing all the way to the top slot in most of them. The caveat however is that we noticed that the device tends to overheat when subjected to heavy or long term use.Even while charging, the S6 Edge heats up to unusable levels.
The overheating is a concern, but the S6 Edge still stands out as a flagship that delivers on all fronts.
And it looks good while at it.
Gagan Gupta

Mm11jun15

ENTREPRENEUR SPECIAL................... The Most Important Questions Entrepreneurs Should Ask Themselves

The Most Important Questions Entrepreneurs Should Ask Themselves

Before starting a business, there are four characteristics an entrepreneur should have, or look for in their partners.
The odds are stacked against entrepreneurs. Most new ventures fail within their first few years in business. Some try to scale up too early, or too late. Others run out of cash in the scramble, forcing founders to close shop before they go into the red. But the most determined will push on regardless.
Hian Goh, the co-founder of the Asian Food Channel (AFC) and an INSEAD alumnus (MBA ‘04D) says entrepreneurs should never accept the fate before them. His statement is rooted in experience. AFC was created in 2005, shortly before the global financial crisis hammered the media industry around the world. It became a household name across the region and, despite the aforementioned turmoil, was spotted and acquired by American media company, Scripps Networks, in 2013.
Roger Egan (MBA ‘10), the co-founder and CEO of RedMart, Singapore’s leading online supermarket, is also living proof of such determination. He found himself packing and delivering customer orders more than once, and even shopping at rival supermarkets to fill orders when his warehouse ran out of stock.
Goh and Egan were sharing their stories with Veronica Chew (MBA ‘10J), the co-founder of Healint and Jani Rautiainen (MBA ‘05D), the co-founder of PropertyGuru, during a panel discussion at INSEAD in memory of the late entrepreneurship professor, Patrick Turner.
The conversation began with Chatri Sityodtong, an INSEAD Entrepreneur in Residence and founder of One Championship, Asia’s largest sports media property, who gave the keynote. He outlined four key qualities that make an entrepreneur, the first being resilience.
Am I resilient?
Sityodtong knows a thing or two about resilience. During his MBA at Harvard Business School his family went bankrupt and his father abandoned the family. He lived on one meal a day and his mother stayed with him in his dorm room. “I thought that the answer to life and happiness was to make a shit load of money,” he told the packed amphitheatre in May.
After leaving school he spent a few years in consulting and investments, before starting his own company and eventually running hedge funds on Wall Street. At age 37, he retired to pursue his true passion: martial arts. “I felt that I was just not adding value to this world,” he explained.
Later, ignoring pleas from his mentors, friends and relatives not to mix business with passion, he created One Championship which now broadcasts to one billion homes around the world.
“Everyone says start-ups fail because they run out of cash. I disagree. They fail because the founder runs out of cash and quits. We’re all MBAs, we can easily get another job, so do I struggle and sink my savings into it or do I quit? I refused to let go. I’ve been rejected a thousand times, I have come close to failure many times, but I refuse to let go.”
Build or borrow the skills?
The second point Sityodtong noted was skills. If you don’t possess all the skills you need, co-founders and partners are crucial complements. The panel was full of co-founders who attested to that view. Goh playfully told us that he was lucky with his co-founder, Maria Brown, a former BBC producer. “She’s a person who knew how to make television and I knew Excel spreadsheets. As for diversity, I am from Singapore and she is British. That made a lot of sense because we had such different perspectives about what food meant to people and what we were passionate about. I believe that extreme diversity allows you a better shot at being smarter. I never would have made it without my co-founder.”
Chew agreed, noting that her co-founders have strong pharmaceutical and technical backgrounds which complemented her medical devices expertise to run their digital healthcare analytics company.
Can I add value?
Once a start-up is in business and gaining customers, what should it do next? Sityodtong and all the panellists agreed that they should continue to grow their value propositions. “Your job as an entrepreneur has to be to continue to grow that value proposition so nobody can catch up with you,” Sityodtong said.
Adding value should also sit at the centre of a firm’s strategy and entrepreneurs should keep it in mind in everything they do. Start-ups come about because a founder has a clear idea of what the customer needs and how to provide it, but all too often, they get carried away with execution. While resilience and skillsets are essential, I would also argue that strategy and value proposition determine whether the entrepreneur succeeds or fails.
Does market size matter?
The fourth and equally important quality is finding space to grow. All co-founders at the session had a similar strategy: they created new markets. RedMart pioneered online shopping in a country with a notorious love of browsing supermarket aisles; Hian opened Asia’s culinary scene to the world; Jani made an indispensable platform for property searches; and Chew addresses a fundamental healthcare issue; making healthcare accessible for everyone. Sityodtong did the same in a region that had a 4,000-year history of martial arts but no single sports media property to house it. “Having a big market allows you to pivot and make mistakes and still have an opportunity for success,” he said.
I would add that this depends on your ambitions. If your expertise is in a market where incumbents already exist, it is still possible to enter it, but the entrepreneur will have to consider constant evolution and multiple market entry strategies to evolve and keep adding value.
So do you have it? A lot of it has to do with being honest about your resilience and your skillsets from the start. A co-founder can keep you going and vice versa, and will also serve as a foundation for a good strategy, bringing multiple perspectives. But adding value and the market you’re entering are both constantly evolving phenomena; success rests on your ability to keep moving with them.
This post is based on a panel discussion at an INSEAD Alumni Fund entrepreneurship event in memory of Patrick Turner at the INSEAD Asia Campus in May.

Henrich Greve, INSEAD Professor of Entrepreneurship  

Read more at http://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/the-most-important-questions-entrepreneurs-should-ask-themselves-4073#0eP6wcZKWcdjy6V4.99

FOOD SPECIAL ....................BUN APPÉTIT How the burger got better

BUN APPÉTIT How the burger got better


It's no longer the stuff of assembly lines and quick service. The burger is moving onto specialty menus as restaurants restyle it, and connoisseurs are willing to fork out up to Rs 1,000 for the perfect patty and bun

Till not too long ago, a burger was something you ate when you were short on time, on the move and unwilling to spend more than a hundred bucks. It wasn't a meal very high on the food chain. But now the fast food staple has gone upscale.
Social media discussions about where to get the best burger in Delhi or Mumbai abound, and can often get heated as people debate bun-patty ratio and whether the fries are handcrafted.
Acclaimed chef, writer, and TV show host Ritu Dalmia has a simple explanation for why the burger is back with a bang.“Let's face it, we all love comfort food, and that's why burgers have regained prominence. Today's burger is not about junk food, but a recreation of something comforting with good ingredients and a touch of sophistication,“ says Dalmia. The Calcutta Vegetable Cutlet burger, which includes the meaty vegetable jackfruit, at Depot 29, her Mexican and American inspired dining space, could convert many a carnivore.
Other restaurants too have given the quotidian burger a touch of posh, by replacing processed, frozen meat with choice cuts of organic meat and the sorry-looking coleslaw with farm-grown salad leaves. Importantly, unlike a fast-food chain, these restaurants offer a distinctive dining experience, complete with full-table service. They also offer diners a high level of customization, such as choosing an ingredient or a topping and how they want their meat done. Fork You, a speciality burger restaurant in Delhi, lets you “build your own burger“ and offers up to 10oz (approximately 280 grams) meat patty , four kinds of buns, five types of cheese and more than 15 toppings.
The burger menu at Monkey Bar, the gastro pub that appeals to fussy teenagers as much as their parents, offers seven variations of the burger, including two veggie options. In its latest Mumbai out post, diners can order the Idaho Bill, a crispy chicken patty with blue cheese mayo in a red bun, or the Lamb Burger, which combines jalapeno dust, grilled apples, pickled onions with a Bannur lamb patty .“People have finally woken up to the fact that they can play around with the basic format of a burger,“ says Manu Chandra, executive chef and partner at Monkey Bar and The Fatty Bao. “Once you have a basic foundation of meat and bread, the options are endless. At Monkey Bar, we offered a clean and honest burger and found that there was a high demand for different and new ideas within that section,“ he adds.
If people thought Kelvin Cheung of Ellipsis in Mumbai was mad when he priced the Angus beef burger with caramelized onions at Rs 1,000--taxes extra--they had to eat their words. Crowds throng the Colaba haunt for the Animal Burger (single patty for Rs 800 and double for Rs 1,200).The Canadian, who earned his burger stripes running kitchens at restaurants in Chicago, Toronto, Vancouver and Dinant (Belgium), believes that social media has played a big role in the burger movement.“Armed with Instagram and Twitter, the consumer in Mumbai is much more food savvy and more willing to try and pay for a better, tastier product,“ says Cheung.
The current trend of burgers borders on over the top. Everyone wants to make the biggest, juiciest burger. Cafe Delhi Heights' Juicy Lucy Burger is a mammoth 250 grams of lamb mince with a cheese and jalapeno stuffing in a sesame seed bun.Eating it is quite a messy affair but they've sold more than 93,000 Juicy Lucys. Coloured buns are the craze--black, blue, red, you think it and it exists. Everyone's experimenting with fries, a classic accompaniment to the burger. From sweet potato fries to crisps to Canadian poutine, the range is vast. “You have a couple of extremes but most chefs are gravitating to classic style burgers,“ feels Cheung.
Chandra says that even as mainstream international burger chains (Wendy's and Burger King are two new entrants) move into the Indian market, the burger will continue to move away from the quick service restaurant format. “Just take a look at what Shake Shack has done for the burger. It has established itself as a global brand and is far-removed from a QSR product. There's similar excitement in India around the burger,“ says Chandra.
A burger shakedown can only mean happier stomachs.
Ruhi Batra

TOI14JUN15

BUSINESS SPECIAL..................... INDIA’S HOTTEST BUSINESS LEADERS 40 AND UNDER Nos.31 TO 33

INDIA’S HOTTEST BUSINESS LEADERS 40 AND UNDER Nos.31 TO 33

31.Punit Lalbhai, 33


Executive Director, Arvind
Education: Master's in Environmental Science (Yale), MBA (INSEAD)
Claim to fame: Developing Arvind's sustainability strategy
Best advice anybody gave me: “Whatever you do, do it very very well' this was said to me by my biology teacher and dear, dear friend, Father Morondo
Success to me is: A mirage. There are always newer boundaries to push that make past achievements pale in comparison.
My favorite people: My Gurujis: Shri Parthasarathi Rajagopalachari & Shri Kamlesh Patel.My family. From the world of business, Kumar Mangalam Birla, Anand Mahendra, Kasturbhai Lalbhai and JRD Tata.
What I wanted to be when I was 20 years old: An ecologist.
What I want to be when I'm 50: Making a difference to society through the platform of industry & entrepreneurship.
One thing I would like to change about myself: Developing the ability to do the most unpleasant things with the highest dedication, priority and effectiveness tops the list
How I unwind: Being part of the Shri Ramchandra mission has had an impact on me and my family spiritually. I also like to spend time in the outdoors observing, studying, enjoying nature.
My favourite book: Lord of the Rings, Noble House
My favourite movie: The Godfather
My favourite song: Aaye na Baalam (Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan)

32.Anuj R. Miglani, 40


Managing Director, Uttam Galva Steels
Education: Imperial College of Science & Technology, UK
Claim to fame: Integrating group companies into a cohesive unit
Best piece of advice anybody gave me: My brother, who told me “If it isn't broken don't fix it“
My favorite people: My dad, brother and Steve Waugh
What I wanted to be when I was 20 years old : A good son
What I want to be when I'm 50 : A good father
If there is one thing I would like to change about myself: Improve my work life balance
How I unwind: I listen to music (anything that is pleasing to the ear)

33.Nikhil Sawhney, 38


Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Triveni Turbine
Education: Cambridge University, Wharton School (MBA)
Claim to fame: Helped build Triveni Turbine into the second largest small steam turbine manufacturer globally
My favorite people: Gandhi, Plato, Yoda
What I wanted to be when I was 20 years old: A Man
What I want to be when I'm 50: The Man
If there is one thing I would like to change about myself: My six-pack, or lack of!
How I unwind: Intense reflection
ETCD19JUN15



Monday, June 29, 2015

HEALTH SPECIAL .....................Beat the bloat

Beat the bloat

Sudden weight gain, ballooned-out body, puffed-up legs, ankles, feet, hands, eyes and face… suffering from these water-retention signs? There could be serious causes for waterlogged tissues or something as simple as wrong eating habits. Nutritionist Kavita Devgan lists common ones and provides solutions


Reason 1
Unhealthy eating, junk food and irregular food habits can lead to toxicity and land you with a waterlogged body.
Sort it out: Besides checking your diet, also have these natural diuretics:
l Drink upto three cups of parsley tea a day. Brew two teaspoons of dried parsley leaves per cup of boiling water and steep for 10 minutes.
l Drink lemon juice mixed in water, tomato juice and grapefruit juice.
l Eat celery, lettuce, carrots, onion, asparagus, tomato and cucumber.
l Make your cuppa green; polyphenols and potent plant antioxidants present in green tea not only bestow immune-boosting effects, but also help cut the bloat by effectively flushing out the toxins.
l A few of cups of tea with saunf (fennel seeds) improves the functioning of kidneys, liver and spleen. Get your lymphatic system up and running again.
Reason 2
Inadequate protein in diet.
Sort it out: For a carb-protein balance:
l Combine protein with complex carbohydrates at every meal or snack–fish with rice, muesli with yoghurt, wholewheat toast with egg, etc.
l Make sure you have good sources of lean protein in at least two meals, every day. Options: lean meat, chicken, fish, eggs, cottage cheese, milk, yoghurt, legumes, lentils, tofu and soya nuggets.
Reason 3
Unhealthy gut? A bloated belly could also be a sign of improper digestion.
Sort it out: with these simple steps:
l Chew your food thoroughly.
l Top up the good bacteria in your intestines by increasing intake of yoghurt, fermented products like idlis, buttermilk and probiotic products (milk, ice creams, yoghurt, etc).
l Score probiotics (fibre that the good bacteria feed on) present in greens, oats, onions, bananas, legumes.
Reason 4
Sodium-potassium imbalance is another common cause that can result from going overboard on popcorn or spicy chats (basically ‘ODing’ on salt).
Sort it out: by reducing intake of salty foods and having potassium -rich foods.
l Have a banana (loaded with potassium, so are most fruits) or two or beans, potato, sweet potato and watermelon.
l Munch on prunes and carrots.
l Sip coconut water.
Reason 5
Deficiency of certain vital nutrients in the diet like vitamin A and C (that strengthen the capillary walls) and B and D (that impact the body’s use of hormones) as well as calcium and magnesium (important in maintaining the body’s fluid balance) can also lead to water retention.
Sort it out: with sufficient fruits and vegetables; they are good sources of vitamin A and C. Get magnesium from amla, berries, citrus fruits, apples, bananas, dark-green leafy veggies, carrots, pumpkin...
l For Vitamin B, have dairy products (also for calcium), fish and green veggies. For the lactose-intolerant alternatives are: soy milk and sesame seeds.
l Vitamin D is simple–spend 30 minutes in direct sunlight, everyday without fail.
Kavita Devgan
Dnasunday14JUN15


BUSINESS SPECIAL ....................INDIA’S HOTTEST BUSINESS LEADERS 40 AND UNDER Nos.31 TO 33

HOTTEST BUSINESS LEADERS 40 AND UNDER Nos.31 TO 33

31.Punit Lalbhai, 33


Executive Director, Arvind
Education: Master's in Environmental Science (Yale), MBA (INSEAD)
Claim to fame: Developing Arvind's sustainability strategy
Best advice anybody gave me: “Whatever you do, do it very very well' this was said to me by my biology teacher and dear, dear friend, Father Morondo
Success to me is: A mirage. There are always newer boundaries to push that make past achievements pale in comparison.
My favorite people: My Gurujis: Shri Parthasarathi Rajagopalachari & Shri Kamlesh Patel.My family. From the world of business, Kumar Mangalam Birla, Anand Mahendra, Kasturbhai Lalbhai and JRD Tata.
What I wanted to be when I was 20 years old: An ecologist.
What I want to be when I'm 50: Making a difference to society through the platform of industry & entrepreneurship.
One thing I would like to change about myself: Developing the ability to do the most unpleasant things with the highest dedication, priority and effectiveness tops the list
How I unwind: Being part of the Shri Ramchandra mission has had an impact on me and my family spiritually. I also like to spend time in the outdoors observing, studying, enjoying nature.
My favourite book: Lord of the Rings, Noble House
My favourite movie: The Godfather
My favourite song: Aaye na Baalam (Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan)

32.Anuj R. Miglani, 40


Managing Director, Uttam Galva Steels
Education: Imperial College of Science & Technology, UK
Claim to fame: Integrating group companies into a cohesive unit
Best piece of advice anybody gave me: My brother, who told me “If it isn't broken don't fix it“
My favorite people: My dad, brother and Steve Waugh
What I wanted to be when I was 20 years old : A good son
What I want to be when I'm 50 : A good father
If there is one thing I would like to change about myself: Improve my work life balance
How I unwind: I listen to music (anything that is pleasing to the ear)

33.Nikhil Sawhney, 38


Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Triveni Turbine
Education: Cambridge University, Wharton School (MBA)
Claim to fame: Helped build Triveni Turbine into the second largest small steam turbine manufacturer globally
My favorite people: Gandhi, Plato, Yoda
What I wanted to be when I was 20 years old: A Man
What I want to be when I'm 50: The Man
If there is one thing I would like to change about myself: My six-pack, or lack of!
How I unwind: Intense reflection

ETCD19JUN15